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Washington Labor & Employment Wire » DOL Clarifies FLSA Tip Credit, Declines to Amend Regulations Governing the Fluctuating Workweek

DOL Clarifies FLSA Tip Credit, Declines to Amend Regulations Governing the Fluctuating Workweek


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            On Tuesday, April 5, 2011, the Department of Labor (DOL) published updated regulations to the FLSA that were intended to conform the Act to subsequent legislation. The regulations were initially proposed in 2008 under the Bush administration. While the final rule updates regulations regarding the tip credit to reflect an increase in the minimum wage and clarifies existing overtime exemptions for employees engaged in fire protection activities, the rule is more interesting for what it does not do. In response to negative comments from employee groups, DOL opted not to adopt changes that would have clarified that salaried, non-exempt employees could receive bonuses under the fluctuating work week method of compensating overtime. 

            In addition to raising the maximum federal tip credit to $5.12 per hour, the final rule eliminated the maximum contribution percentage on valid mandatory tip pools. Notably, however, the DOL did not adopt a proposed regulation clarifying that bona fide bonus or premium payments do not invalidate the fluctuating workweek method of compensation. This proposal had been supported by the Chamber of Commerce, among other pro-employer entities. Commenters opposed to the proposed rule argued that it would allow employers to reduce employees’ fixed weekly salaries and instead provide compensation primarily through bonus and premium pay. The DOL noted that “in general, commenters representing employers favored the revisions while commenters representing employees strongly opposed the revisions.”

            DOL had also proposed a change to clarify that under section 7(o) of the FLSA, states and local governments that grant employees compensatory time off instead of cash overtime compensation must allow employees to use the compensatory time off on the date requested absent undue disruption to the agency. This clarification was not adopted in the final rule, but DOL reiterated that it maintains its longstanding position that employees are entitled to use compensatory time on the date requested. The final rule also does not include several other provisions originally proposed including providing an overtime exemption for service managers, service writers, service advisers, and service salesman; a regulation that allows an employer to take a meal credit even where the employee does not accept the meal voluntarily; and, examples of when pay is not required for employees who use their employer’s vehicle in home-to-work commuting.